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User Imagecat
6:08 pm Wednesday
February 4, 2009
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have hit a wall. can´t understand lead guitar and really getting sick about it. don´t know theory or how to use scales to play lead all over neck. can play a little in the box but want to know how to move around. can anyone help.
thanks Question
User ImageMike Lindyn
11:21 pm Wednesday
February 4, 2009
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Hi Darren,

Well it seems like you know where you want to go... That´s a good start. Also you´ve worked with basic box patterns and that a great place to build from because leads played all over the fretboard are just box patterns (or ideas like "box patterns") strung together.

To start with I´d suggest that you read this article as it will give you a an idea of the technical elements you will need to develop:
The First 5 Things To Learn On Guitar

The lesson above covers the elements you will need to master but it really does not go into how to use each element or to blend the elements together. To go into this requires questions about the genre and styles you wish to play and gets kind of subjective.

From reading your profile I see you are into blues... That being the case I would suggest learning these box patterns first. THey are availble in that lesson too but I´m post them here too.


Once you have these patterns down you can teach yourself to move through one into another and then the whole fretboard can open up for you. Guitar

This little blues melody lesson may also start you in the right direction.
User Imagecat
4:58 pm Tuesday
February 10, 2009
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thanks

thanks alot for the info Mike. I will work on these. One guestion that I have always had is when you shift out of one box to another do you stay in the same key? Are you just changing octaves or are you moving to a whole other scale? Thanks again. Love this site.
Darren {aka Cat}
User Imagejeremy
11:19 pm Tuesday
February 10, 2009
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Where´s Mike when you need him? I´ll try to answer the question... I´ll use the boxes that Mike posted up there as an example. If you noodle around the neck using those 5 boxes (played in the positions that are indicated on each diagram) then you can think of it as playing in one key (A). I think that´s an easy way to think about it. But you could play through the same boxes over a chord progression that shifts around a lot and depending on how you look at it you could actually be playing in different keys relative to the chords that you´re playing over.

This is how I always look at lead playing... what I do is I always start with the chord progression. I look at the notes in all of the chords in the progression and try to find a scale that uses those same notes. The scale can also contain notes that aren´t in the chords as long as they don´t fight the chords (cause dissonance) but I´ll choose to hang on certain notes that work with the chords and not against them. But then sometimes you wanna go for a weird sound and you´ll purposely play notes that are kinda out of key. Like my favorite band, Slayer. Alota dudes will say that those guys have no clue what they´re playing. And that may be somewhat true but you know what? I think it sounds cool. So sometimes if it sounds cool to you then that´s all that matters.
User ImageMike Lindyn
3:24 pm Wednesday
February 11, 2009
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Hi cat,

Everything Jeremy said was spot right on... All of the scales I included are in the same key so as you move through them you are staying in key. There are other octaves that are in involved but that is just because they are all in the same key. I also liked Jeremy explanation of when to use what scales over a given progression. Thumbs Up

The scales I was showing there were different ways to play the A Pentatonic scale over the entire fretboard. The Pentatonic is the basic building block of most rock and blues music. There are 5 notes in this scale, they are: A C D E G. So all the scales I wrote out before were made up of the notes A C D E G.

Learning these basic scales is a pretty fast and easy way to get started with playing lead guitar.

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