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Stamina + Misc

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Defualt User ImageWorldDecay
5:49 am Monday
January 23, 2006
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I've been doing some power metal riffing nowadays, and i get tired fast, although the playing is fairly solid. What do I need to do to increase my stamina (to say, 5 mins straight for 10 sets within and hour?)

Plus, when i'm outside, in public transport, while waiting for school, during boring classes, what can i do to improve my guitar playing without an actual guitar or any artificial instruments?
User ImageBillyJack
11:52 am Monday
January 23, 2006
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Quote From Loyct:
I've been doing some power metal riffing nowadays, and i get tired fast, although the playing is fairly solid. What do I need to do to increase my stamina (to say, 5 mins straight for 10 sets within and hour?)


You might look into this exerciser.
http://www.old-fashioned-values.com/get_item_th512_wrist-exerciser.htm
Bike riders use a simular devise that has a hand grip built onto it. Haven't found a link to it yet but, my local Yamaha shop sales them. You check around your area. I like the throttle grip better because you hold it very simular to the guitar neck, just a little tighter.

[quote:409d30a183] Plus, when i'm outside, in public transport, while waiting for school, during boring classes, what can i do to improve my guitar playing without an actual guitar or any artificial instruments?

I'm real into the study of intervals right now so what I do when I'm away from my guitar is, think of the relationships of each interval from a given root.

You may or may not be familure with the following:

The intervals are,
Root, minor 2nd, Major 2nd, minor 3rd, Major 3rd, Perfect 4th, Diminished 5th, Perfect 5th, minor 6th, Major 6th, minor/dominate 7th, Major 7th, Octive.

The distance of each interval from one another stays constance reguardless of key.





In those diagrams the P4, for example, is below the Root (the charts are inverted so below = above. It's actually below on your guitar). Doesn't matter if it's in "A" (1st diagram) or "C" (2nd Diagram) or any other root. M3 is behind P4 / m7 below the P4 and any other relationship I can get it stick. What I do, when my guitar is not close by, is work out the relationships in my head. I do this so I can visualize chords and scales without even picking up the guitar. I just have to remember the "B" string is a halfstep flat so you have to shift the relationship one fret sharp when going from the "G" string to the "B" and flat from "B" to "G". I used the charts to get down a few relationships but, after learning a couple I started calculating them without an aid.

This maybe below your level of playing and you already know it but, it is just what I do.

Hope it helps.
Defualt User ImageWorldDecay
2:29 am Tuesday
January 24, 2006
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It is not below my level, its a whole new way of viewiing intervals.

Is perfect 4th same as the root note?
User ImageBillyJack
7:09 am Tuesday
January 24, 2006
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Quote From Loyct:
Is perfect 4th same as the root note?

No, it's just a 4, the root is going to be a 1.
In "A" the 4 is "D" A,B,C#,D
In "C" the 4 is "F" C,D,E,F
(both cases, and in all cases except the "B" string, the 4 is below the root on the guitar neck.)

I'm just guessing but, I'd say it's called a Perfect 4th, same as with the Perfect 5th, because they have no minor counter part.
Major Scale = 1,M2,M3,P4,P5,M6,M7,1
natural minor = 1,m2,m3,P4,P5,m6,m7,1
(just a guess Wink )

The reason I use the 4 so much in my example is because it's what I use primarily to map the intervals on the guitar. It centers me up in between my most common used intervals.

1 is above the 4
5 is two fret sharp of 4
3 is one fret flat of 4
dom7 is below the 4

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